• Ed and Lorraine Warren in Jim Thorpe, PA in 1988.
    Contributed Articles,  Demonology,  Parapsychology

    The Warrens & the Smurl House of Horror

    By Maxim W. Furek
    Contributor to Normal Paranormal

    One of the most horrific cases of purported demonic possession occurred over a 13-year period in West Pittston, Pennsylvania. The horror took root inside a 92-year-old duplex dwelling located at 328-330 Chase Street that belonged to Jack and Janet Smurl and Jack’s parents.

    From 1974 to 1987, the Smurls and their four daughters were terrorized by howls and blood-curdling screams, pig grunts, kitchen appliances catching fire, and awful odors. Amorphous black clouds materialized inside the lodging. Janet was dragged out of bed by malevolent forces and Jack was sexually assaulted by a succubus, a demon in female form.

    The Smurl family in 1986.
    Original image taken by The Tribune (Scranton, PA).

    Monsignor Francis Kane was the pastor of their Immaculate Conception parish. He went to the home and blessed every room. After the spirits continued to torment them, he did this again. Monsignor Eugene J. Clark, rector of St. Pius X. Seminary, Dalton, PA., was directed by church officials to stay overnight on three occasions but observed nothing unusual.

    Finally, after agonizing torment, they began to look outside the church for help, and paranormal researchers Ed (1926-2006) and Lorraine (1927-2019) Warren were called in to investigate. Ed, a former police officer, described himself as a “religious demonologist,” and Lorraine as a “sensitive clairvoyant,” with the ability to see that which seems to be invisible.

  • Jim Morrison's grave
    Contributed Articles

    The Death Conspiracy Theories of Jim Morrison

    By Maxim W. Furek
    Contributor to Normal Paranormal

    He was the charismatic lead singer of the Doors, a 1960s band blending rock, blues, and psychedelia in hit songs including “Light My Fire,” “Touch Me,” and “Riders on The Storm.” Their appeal coupled well-crafted studio songs with Jim Morrison’s overt sexuality, adolescent poetry, and Los Angeles swagger.

    Wearing tight leather and calling himself the ‘Lizard King,’ Morrison’s stage act was typically a drunken, profanity-laced charade of self-destruction, but after he allegedly exposed himself during several concerts, the game was afoot. Morrison fled to Paris seeking refuge from the legalities surrounding a Miami ‘indecent exposure’ incident. He had avoided jail with a pending appeal, bail of $50,000, and a plane ticket to France.

    He wandered the streets of the city, dog-eared folders of poetry in a plastic bag, under his arm, taking in the aura of the ghosts and poets who called this place home. He discovered the Rock and Roll Circus, a nightclub in the trendy Left Bank, and partied there ‘practically every night’ with the likes of Roman Polanski and Marianne Faithfull, the Beatles and Stones. Morrison, who envisioned himself an exiled American poet, arrived in The City of Lights in March 1971 with common-law wife Pamela Courson. Four months later he was dead.